VIDEO: Spoolfool Productions Announces Magnetic Quarter Panel Protectors

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We’ve had a close relationship with our friends over at Spoolfool Productions ever since they started up back in 2011 or or so. A small parts innovator based out of SoCal, Owner/Founder Mike Barnard has taken it upon himself to provide specialty products for Turbo Buick owners.

Initially, he launched high-quality bumper fillers for the front and rear, which replace the subpar-quality pieces from General Motors. They are also arguably made of better materials than some of the fiberglass units we’ve seen over the years.

As time went on, he’s announced one- and three-piece rear spoilers, a very unique turbo shield, a fiberglas radiator hold-down and most recently, these Magnetic Quarter Panel Protectors.

Designed a a simple, temporary add-on, the idea is you stick on to the lower rear section of your quarter-panel to protect from the stones that kick up from your drag radials, and for easier clean-up from the shredded rubber from the burnout box.

Mike, aka Spoolfool, also elaborates a bit further in this clip on what’s best to use for cleanup, prior to the inevitable burnout; comparing wax, WD-40, silicone spray, Rain-X and absolutely nothing. As it turns out, car wax was the best in Spoolfool’s observation, though we kind of liked how WD cleaned up from where we’re sitting.

The best part of the deal, is that these are made right here in the USA and retail for only $30.00! For something that protects you paint from stone chips and caked-on tire rubber, we think these are a great investment — and work perfectly for your ’81-87 Regal. Based on the dimensions, we’re sure that these could be used for other G-body vehicles as well.

Features:

  • Affordable ($30.00)
  • Made in the USA
  • Easy to apply and remove
  • Protects paint from stone ship, burnt rubber, etc
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Being infatuated with cars since he was a toddler, GM EFI Founder and Editor, Rick Seitz, has a true love and passion for late-model GM vehicles. When he isn’t tuning, testing, or competing with the brand’s current crop of project vehicles, he’s busy tinkering and planning the next modifications for his own cars.

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